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The Little Red Hen...ever think about easy we really have it?
#1
My Grandmother used to tell me a story about the Little Red Hen. It was about working hard and used the example of every step of baking a loaf bread, from preparing the soil to baking the bread.

We used to have to work so hard just to eat. I often think about how little effort we have to put in today to have a loaf of bread.

The story of the Little Red Hen is about work and helping others, but it always made me think of how much work the Little Red Hen did to make her bread.

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#2
Reminds me of what my hillbilly grandma taught me. I spent a summer with her when I was ten years old. She taught me how to use a shotgun and how to hunt. She said "Never miss!" in such a way that I took it very seriously.

Next day she sent me out in the woods to hunt. She said "Don't Miss!" and gave one shotgun shell. Long story shot, I missed.

When I told my grandma that I missed. She said "I guess it is only vegetables tonight."

I pulled out a stringer of fish hidden on the front porch. Grandma smiled. She loved fish.
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#3
(02-18-2020, 02:47 AM)Jeffery Wrote: Reminds me of what my hillbilly grandma taught me. I spent a summer with her when I was ten years old. She taught me how to use a shotgun and how to hunt. She said "Never miss!" in such a way that I took it very seriously.

Next day she sent me out in the woods to hunt. She said "Don't Miss!" and gave one shotgun shell. Long story shot, I missed.

When I told my grandma that I missed. She said "I guess it is only vegetables tonight."

I pulled out a stringer of fish hidden on the front porch. Grandma smiled. She loved fish.

I think about the household things my grandmother had in the 60s. We've made a lot of improvements but most things we have today there was something that could do it back then. Like a microwave. It's been invented since then but there were still ovens that could cook. Smile

The only thing I can really think of that we have now that she do then was computer/Net/smartphone....maybe a vcr/tivo.
Get and spend Cow Chips just for being a Pheeds Phorum member...
(Never let anyone tell you that you shouldn't spend them all in one place.)
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#4
You guys speaking about your grandparents brings back some memories.  Both sets of my grandparents were farmers.  As a kid, my parents would take me to help them.  I called one set of grandparents, grandmama & granddaddy, and the other set maw maw and paw paw.  Granddaddy taught me how to drive a tractor when I was 7-8 years old.  He'd let me do things like mow his farm, disc his garden and haul things with his old army trailer.

Now my paw paw, on the other hand, was a bit meaner.  He'd have me out in the fields hand-picking vegetables.  I don't know if any of you have ever picked okra by hand but I don't recommend it.  I got itchy all over.

I often tell my girls that they have no clue how easy they have it these days.  Yes, I remember my parents telling me the same things.  It just seems more prevalent these days with all the advancements in technology.

We didn't have remotes for televisions (remember foil on the rabbit ears?).  No computer, internet, smartphones, alexa etc.

Our social media was going outside and playing with the neighborhood kids until dark.  Kids hardly ever go outside anymore.

Preparing a meal these days is as easy as tossing something in the microwave or calling DoorDash.

Although technology has greatly helped society.  In some ways, it's done more harm than good.
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#5
(02-20-2020, 04:35 AM)Dkillo Wrote: You guys speaking about your grandparents brings back some memories.  Both sets of my grandparents were farmers.  As a kid, my parents would take me to help them.  I called one set of grandparents, grandmama & granddaddy, and the other set maw maw and paw paw.  Granddaddy taught me how to drive a tractor when I was 7-8 years old.  He'd let me do things like mow his farm, disc his garden and haul things with his old army trailer.

Now my paw paw, on the other hand, was a bit meaner.  He'd have me out in the fields hand-picking vegetables.  I don't know if any of you have ever picked okra by hand but I don't recommend it.  I got itchy all over.

I often tell my girls that they have no clue how easy they have it these days.  Yes, I remember my parents telling me the same things.  It just seems more prevalent these days with all the advancements in technology.

We didn't have remotes for televisions (remember foil on the rabbit ears?).  No computer, internet, smartphones, alexa etc.

Our social media was going outside and playing with the neighborhood kids until dark.  Kids hardly ever go outside anymore.

Preparing a meal these days is as easy as tossing something in the microwave or calling DoorDash.

Although technology has greatly helped society.  In some ways, it's done more harm than good.


My grandmother grew up on a farm in Kansas. She was the youngest of 14 kids and all 14 graduated from college. She was a nurse in the Philippines during WWII and had to make an escape when Macarthur evacuated and declared "I shall return." After the war she taught jr. high math.

My loaf in the bread machine is almost done and every time I make a loaf in it I think of Grandma and the Little Red Hen. I just go to the store and buy a few things, then measure them out and dump them all in the machine and press a button and that's when I want to "work". I usually just buy a loaf of bread at the store. LOL
Get and spend Cow Chips just for being a Pheeds Phorum member...
(Never let anyone tell you that you shouldn't spend them all in one place.)
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#6
14 kids! Have mercy. They sure had large families back then. Living on a farm though, they weren't just having kids, they were making farmhands lol.
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#7
14 kids. My grandma had 14 kids as well. West Virginia.

Grandma owned a large two story house next to a coal mine. All of the kids, 12 girls and 2 boys, were 'hardy' to say the least. Grandma raised them to know what hard work was.

Homemade bread was Grandma's claim to fame. Old black cast iron ovens in the cellar and the girls worked in shifts. The coal mine picked up the bread 24 hours a day except for Sundays.

Homemade lye soap was made outside and again the girls worked shifts. She sold the soap to the mine and the general store,

Also, on weekends the miners would come to the house for a bath in black wash tubs in the cellar that the boys staffed. The miners sat down to a hillbilly dinner of possum and sweet potatoes and homemade bread with cool sassafras tea. My Grandpa was the town barber and sold moonshine.

Grandma would sit on the front porch of the second story with a shotgun across her lap every time the miners visited.
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#8
Very cool story Jeffery.

Sounds like Grandma wasn't playing around when those miners came to visit.

I like hearing stories about all the things people did in earlier times to raise money. Very creative entrepreneurial minds to say the least.
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#9
(02-22-2020, 04:30 AM)Dkillo Wrote: Very cool story Jeffery.

Sounds like Grandma wasn't playing around when those miners came to visit.

I like hearing stories about all the things people did in earlier times to raise money.  Very creative entrepreneurial minds to say the least.
Me too.

Grandma and Grandpa were full blooded Greeks, so my mother was also a full blooded Greek.

My aunts would tell stories of their hard life growing up. The house was next to railroad tracks and the only train was the coal companies that carried coal to a coal plant. Couple times a day that train slowly went by the house.

The coal company had a business arrangement with grandma. When the train stopped in front of the house and blew the whistle grandma rushed all of her daughters to put on their Sunday dresses, made out of gunny sacks, and literally leashed them to the clothesline.

Typically, two or three business men debarked the train for lunch at grandma's boarding house. No shotgun - it sat in a nearby hiding place. The business men had a clear view of the girls.

One day the train stopped and a dozen or so business men sat down for lunch. Fried chicken no possum, lol.

One of the businessmen was a big shot as grandma called him. He politely asked grandma if he could be served by the young lady 'fourth from the left'.. Aunt Bertha.

Long story short, the businessman spent weeks courting Aunt Bertha (grandmas way) and ended up marrying Aunt Bertha.

Before my teen years I spent another summer at their home in the big city. Aunt Bertha was still getting used to electricity, running water, indoor toilets and telephones, lol.

My new uncle became a father figure to me. He loved chess and taught me how to play. He taught me how to do math and more importantly how it applied to business.

I taught him how to hunt and fish.

One day he asked me something like.. "Knowing what you have learnt about chess and business math and knowing what you know about hunting and fishing - how can you make money?"

Being a young'un I said "Fishing worms and flies!"

He looked at me like I lost my mind and replied "Elaborate please."

I said "You and your friends love to fish on the weekends and your always sending your gardener to fetch worms. There must be money in that since not everyone has access to fishing worms?"

Long story short.. I own three worm farms that have kept my plate full of fish for years. Smile
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