The Lady and the Unicorn

The Lady and the Unicorn (French: La dame à la licorne) is the title of a cycle of tapestries often considered one of the greatest works of art of the Middle Ages in Europe. They are estimated to have been woven in the early 16th century, in Flanders. They depict the six senses - hearing, sight, taste, touch, smell, and "A mon seul désir" (French for "to my only desire"), often interpreted as love. Each of the six tapestries depicts a noble lady with the unicorn and some include a monkey or a lion in the scene.

The tapestries are done in the style of mille-fleurs, French for "thousand flowers".

The cycle is currently held in the Musée Cluny (Musée du Moyen-Age), Paris.


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