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Content Analysers
#1
Anyone using content analyser software to increase their rankings??   I think I've tried nearly all of them over the last year or so and think I've finally found one that works Rolleyes .  It's easy to use (some are very convoluted) and pretty much improves my rankings to some extent just with on page modifications in about 80-90% of cases.  I'm pretty much spending all my time updating pages at the moment as it seems to work so well. 

The one I'm using is called SurferSEO, I'd be interested in hearing if anyone else is using anything similar.
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#2

Hey Neil,

I haven't used a stand-alone analyzer option in quite a while. I did check out the SurferSEO site and there's a testimonial from Matthew Woodward. I tend to trust his opinions and like his SEO methods.

I have a WP installation that isn't for public content with RankMath installed on it and use it from time to time for analyzing content.
https://rankmath.com/

You may want to check our RankMath and compare it (and the results you get) with SurferSEO.
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#3
Thanks Kurt, I do use Rankmath and agree it's a great tool for optimizing content and has loads of other functionality.  However I found that plugins like this and Yoast, SEOpressor etc - just seem to analyse on a set of default rules - e.g. so much text, headings, use of keyword etc.   They do help but mainly to spot basic on page mistakes.

The content analysers specify optimization for a specific keyword based on the websites that are actually ranking.  As long as you optimize against the right pages (which you can select or default to top 5) it seems to work really well.  Basically it analyses all the aspects of these pages and makes suggestion about content - length, structure, words to be used and NLP words etc.

Anyway working well for me and it seems a really powerful tool. I tried it about 18 months ago and it didn't work at all, however they've updated it a lot since them.   Just adding the NLP suggestions almost always seems to have some positive effect for me (although you could probably get those for free somewhere!).  There are some aspects which don't seem to have much effect though from my testing - e.g changing the word length and user sentiment have usually caused a negative effect  (but that might be just me!).

Might be worth a look for especially for anyone with a lot of older content  that they need to try and reinvigorate.  It's quite cost effective to me - I can pretty much get some rank increase on every page with out spending loads of money or effort on link building.
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#4
(10-31-2020, 10:19 AM)Neil797 Wrote: Thanks Kurt, I do use Rankmath and agree it's a great tool for optimizing content and has loads of other functionality.  However I found that plugins like this and Yoast, SEOpressor etc - just seem to analyse on a set of default rules - e.g. so much text, headings, use of keyword etc.   They do help but mainly to spot basic on page mistakes.

The content analysers specify optimization for a specific keyword based on the websites that are actually ranking.  As long as you optimize against the right pages (which you can select or default to top 5) it seems to work really well.  Basically it analyses all the aspects of these pages and makes suggestion about content - length, structure, words to be used and NLP words etc.

Anyway working well for me and it seems a really powerful tool. I tried it about 18 months ago and it didn't work at all, however they've updated it a lot since them.   Just adding the NLP suggestions almost always seems to have some positive effect for me (although you could probably get those for free somewhere!).  There are some aspects which don't seem to have much effect though from my testing - e.g changing the word length and user sentiment have usually caused a negative effect  (but that might be just me!).

Might be worth a look for especially for anyone with a lot of older content  that they need to try and reinvigorate.  It's quite cost effective to me - I can pretty much get some rank increase on every page with out spending loads of money or effort on link building.

Thanks Neil...If SurferSEO has an affiliate program this would make a good post in the Pharmers Market. Feel free to just copy/paste your posts here on that thread if you want.
Get and spend Cow Chips just for being a Pheeds Phorum member...
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#5
(10-30-2020, 09:08 AM)Neil797 Wrote: Anyone using content analyser software to increase their rankings??   I think I've tried nearly all of them over the last year or so and think I've finally found one that works Rolleyes .  It's easy to use (some are very convoluted) and pretty much improves my rankings to some extent just with on page modifications in about 80-90% of cases.  I'm pretty much spending all my time updating pages at the moment as it seems to work so well. 

The one I'm using is called SurferSEO, I'd be interested in hearing if anyone else is using anything similar.

 
Quote:"Neil797" pid='1996' dateline='1604139569'
Thanks Kurt, I do use Rankmath and agree it's a great tool for optimizing content and has loads of other functionality.  However I found that plugins like this and Yoast, SEOpressor etc - just seem to analyse on a set of default rules - e.g. so much text, headings, use of keyword etc.   They do help but mainly to spot basic on page mistakes.

The content analysers specify optimization for a specific keyword based on the websites that are actually ranking.  As long as you optimize against the right pages (which you can select or default to top 5) it seems to work really well.  Basically it analyses all the aspects of these pages and makes suggestion about content - length, structure, words to be used and NLP words etc.

Anyway working well for me and it seems a really powerful tool. I tried it about 18 months ago and it didn't work at all, however they've updated it a lot since them.   Just adding the NLP suggestions almost always seems to have some positive effect for me (although you could probably get those for free somewhere!).  There are some aspects which don't seem to have much effect though from my testing - e.g changing the word length and user sentiment have usually caused a negative effect  (but that might be just me!).

Might be worth a look for especially for anyone with a lot of older content  that they need to try and reinvigorate.  It's quite cost effective to me - I can pretty much get some rank increase on every page with out spending loads of money or effort on link building.

Neil, how do you know what the page rank is?
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#6
Quote:Neil, how do you know what the page rank is?

Hi Jeffery,
Just to clarify I was referring to the ranking of each page for a particular keyword not the page rank, sorry for confusion.  I have used for many years something called 'serpbook' to track my keyword rankings but to be honest found it got rather inaccurate while it pushed up it's prices.   I now use a program called serprobot (which has a free version which you can use for a few keywords to test) which works just as well.  The only feature I miss is the one where you could analyse what keywords a specific URL will rank for - although of course Ahref/semrush etc do this as well.
I'm not entirely convinced that tracking keywords is the right metric to aim for anymore but can't think of anything better !
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#7
Me personally, I have always put more emphasis on keywords that are relevant to my target markets intent (user intent) and only use keywords that my taget markets are familiar with (keyword familiarity) while at the same time optimizing the pages for SEO. That in itself solves almost 100% of Google 2020 SEO.

The 2020 challenge with Google organic SEO is they may change your 'meta description' in the SERPs which typicaly results in SERP placement that an SEOer did not plan for thus defeating the purpose of content analysis software.

The fix is twofold:
1. Assign keywords based on 'user intent' and user keyword familarity'.
2. Optize each page for SEO.

For may years I have followed those two and only those two aspects of organic SEO regardless of Google's changes with great success.
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#8
Yes that certainly sounds a good strategy!  Although don't quite understand what you mean by keyword familiarity - do you mean brand names or words specific to a particular niche? Sounds interesting. 

To be honest from my experience, I don't really have much trust in any exact method of picking the right keywords initially anymore.  I've wasted so much money on software/subscriptions which predicts high traffic/low competition keywords and they've never really worked properly.  The only one that seemed to work well was a program a guy from the warrior forum produced (sparrow think his name was) but it stopped working a couple of years ago!. SEMrush keyword difficulty score was about the next best I found. 

Now I usually just try and find low competition ones and use them as a starting point.  After a while I check which keywords are getting me clicks in GWT and then optimize each page based on those - sometimes they are the ones I targeted, often completely different. It's only at this point that I use the content analyser to fine tune based on those keywords that give me traffic. 

Indeed Google has been changing the meta description for many years - I remember lots of them used to come automatically from ODP data from DMOZ directory. Especially annoying when you'd had wait years to get included in the damn thing in the first place.  Used to get very frustrating but must admit have always thought it's something I can't control so I just tend to hope mine are used ! 

The content analyser I mentioned has a lot on user sentiment (which I'm presuming is similar to BERT user intent but could be wrong) - you can track the user sentiment e.g. positive, neutral or negative content against a specific keyword.  You can even track the correlation between the sentiment and position in rankings.   I can't quite figure out to do with this information or even whether it's really valid.  You also have to use extra credits to track this so I don't always bother. 

For example I had one keyword where my page was reported as having a strong negative sentiment for a keyword and ranked at number 7. All the other pages in top ten had a strong positive sentiment - the suggestion from the data was that I should change my page to be more positive.   I did a test by trying to change the NLP sentiment by using this site - text2data.com.  I really didn't know what I was doing but swapped out negative words for positive ones based on this.   My site initially dropped lilke a stone from 7 to about 67 for that keyword !!  However after 8 weeks it now seems to have settled at position 3 for a reasonably competitive keyword and is getting a lot more traffic.

I'm not sure I'm convinced yet (as my test has only included one site so far!)  and definitely still don't really understand it though.  Confused Confused Confused   However the idea of significantly boosting a page's traffic with very little effort and no expense certainly appeals !  So will probably try again !
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#9
(11-17-2020, 06:35 PM)Neil797 Wrote: Yes that certainly sounds a good strategy!  Although don't quite understand what you mean by keyword familiarity - do you mean brand names or words specific to a particular niche? Sounds interesting.
KW Familiarity are words or phrases that the user is familiar with in the context of the article, blog post, advert, etc. Example:
We went fishing last weekend and caught 10 catfish.
vs.
We went catfishing last weekend and landed 10 cats.
Explanation:
The target market is obviouslt fishermen. Fishermen use their own unique words and phrases in the Google SERP. With that said.. writers use words and phrases the target market is already familliar with which often show in the SERP description which pulls-in traffic to your blog.

That is just the basics, te very powerful for organic traffic. Lot more to it than that when structuring the website as a whole such as "relevant and in-context content" and "relavant and in-context ads", etc.

Here is the good of it all. After years of optimizing content for SEO on two or three niches the short-tail and long-tail KWs seldom change.
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#10
Thanks Jeffery, sounds very similar to the NLP keywords that this content editor gets from Google.  I think these are the key factor in the improvements I've been getting from this tool - there's lots of other advice but adding these keywords to the text seems to be the most effective!
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