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Singular They, Them
#1
There are several different ways of writing the following. Which makes more sense to you? 

Ignore the fact that you could replace teacher with a name because this same model will be used many times in a 200-page book. This applies to a bunch of scenarios such as a spouse, a patient, a lifeguard, etc. where the gender isn't known or even very important. 

Note that this isn't about gender equality or anything like that. I'm just trying to figure out the best way to get my point across. #1 and #2 seem stuffy to me but while #3 is more and more accepted, there are a lot of people who would say it is wrong and judge the author negatively. 

1. The teacher was told s/he needed to get his/her things together and leave the premises by 2:00 PM.

2. The teacher was told she or he needed to get his or her things together and leave the premises by 2:00 PM.

3. The teacher was told they needed to get their things together and leave the premises by 2:00 PM.

Thanks.
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#2
It depends...are we speaking strictly grammatically or copywriting/PC. I can't speak about grammar, but I would use generally use #3 for any other use than being grammatically correct without knowing the audience or the gender of the teacher.

Writing in "public" is so different than private conversation because you're speaking to so many people. My natural language is to use "guys and girls" when being casual and I don't think of "girls" as meaning "child" in this instance. But I don't use "girls" when writing because there are some that think it's demeaning and my usage isn't the same.
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#3
3. The teacher was told they needed to get their things together and leave the premises by 2:00 PM.

I would use:
3. The teacher was told to 'Kindly put your affairs and personal belongings in order, and leave the premises by 2:00 PM.'
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#4
I agree with the above-stated opinions that #3 is probably the best bet.

It doesn't surprise me that you would think that the audience may think negatively about the author for using #3.  After all, we're living in the age of the "easily offended" these days.  Taking that into account, it would not bother me in the slightest if some were to be offended, put off, or whatever the case may be, by me using a phrase such as that.  I've learned a long time ago that you can't please everyone.  I always tell people that when it comes to anything you say or do, "those that matter don't mind and those that mind don't matter".  It may not be grammatically correct, but it gets the point across.
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