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Oz

This article is about the fictional place, for other meanings see " title="Oz (disambiguation)">Oz (disambiguation).

Oz is an imaginary country first introduced in " title="The Wonderful Wizard of Oz">The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900) by " title="L. Frank Baum">L. Frank Baum. Baum wrote fourteen " title="Children's literature">children's books about Oz and its odd inhabitants. After his death " title="Ruth Plumly Thompson">Ruth Plumly Thompson continued the series.

Oz is a squarish shaped place, surrounded on all sides by a Deadly Desert and divided into four quadrants: the Gillikin country in the north, the Munchkin country in the east, the Quadling country in the south and the Winkie country in the west. The Emerald City sits at the center of Oz. " title="Princess Ozma">Princess Ozma rules the country as a " title="Dictator">benevolent dictator.

Recurring characters in the series include:

An interesting side note was the fact, stated in " title="The Tin Woodman of Oz">The Tin Woodman of Oz, that no one in Oz could die. Anyone killed would continue to live wounded, beheaded or not. This "fact" was not universally adhered to in the novels, particularly those preceding The Tin Woodman of Oz: for instance The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, although containing perhaps the definitive example of the rule (the Tin Woodman's origin), also has the deaths of two wicked witches.

A legend of uncertain validity is that when relating bedtime stories (the origin of the Oz novels) Baum was asked by one of his listeners the name of the magical land. He glanced at a nearby filing cabinet which was marked O-Z. Thus he named the land Oz. Another story is that Oz is a corruption of " title="Uzbekistan">Uz, the homeland of " title="Job">Job in the " title="Old Testament">Old Testament.

Bibliography

  1. Baum, L. Frank (1900). " title="The Wonderful Wizard of Oz">The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Chicago, New York, George M. Hill Company. LC 03032405. (also reprinted by various publishers under the names The New Wizard of Oz and The Wizard of Oz with occasional minor changes in the text)
  2. Baum, L. Frank (1904). " title="The Marvelous Land of Oz">The Marvelous Land of Oz. Chicago, Reilly and Britton Company. LC 04017928. (also reprinted as The Land of Oz)
  3. Baum, L. Frank (1907). " title="Ozma of Oz">Ozma of Oz. Chicago, Reilly and Britton Company. LC 07024773
  4. Baum, L. Frank (1908). " title="Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz">Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz. Chicago, Reilly and Britton Company. LC 08020022
  5. Baum, L. Frank (1909). " title="The Road to Oz">The Road to Oz. Chicago, Reilly and Britton Company. LC 09019832
  6. Baum, L. Frank (1910). " title="The Emerald City of Oz">The Emerald City of Oz. Chicago, Reilly and Britton Company. LC 10025680
  7. Baum, L. Frank (1913). " title="The Patchwork Girl of Oz">The Patchwork Girl of Oz. Chicago, Reilly and Britton Company.
  8. Baum, L. Frank (1914). " title="Tik-Tok of Oz">Tik-Tok of Oz. Chicago, Reilly and Britton Company. LC 14012287
  9. Baum, L. Frank (1915). " title="The Scarecrow of Oz">The Scarecrow of Oz. Chicago, Reilly and Britton Company.
  10. Baum, L. Frank (1916). " title="Rinkitink in Oz">Rinkitink in Oz. Chicago, Reilly and Britton Company. LC 16014719
  11. Baum, L. Frank (1917). " title="The Lost Princess of Oz">The Lost Princess of Oz. Chicago, Reilly and Britton Company. LC 17016754
  12. Baum, L. Frank (1918). " title="The Tin Woodman of Oz">The Tin Woodman of Oz. Chicago, Reilly and Britton Company.
  13. Baum, L. Frank (1919). " title="The Magic of Oz">The Magic of Oz. Chicago, Reilly and Lee Company. LC 19015894
  14. Baum, L. Frank (1920). " title="Glinda of Oz">Glinda of Oz. Chicago, Reilly and Lee Company. LC 20017681

These fourteen books by the original author, another nineteen books by " title="Ruth Plumly Thompson">Ruth Plumly Thompson, and another seven books by various authors comprise the "Famous Forty", which is considered the classic original series (though inconsistencies make it difficult to call it canonical). Other books were less well known or failed to remain in print. As the earlier works have fallen out of copyright (including all of L. Frank Baum's titles), numerous other books have been written in the series by many authors and publishers, some of whom continue to publish new works today.