Black supremacy

Black supremacy groups preach that black people are inherently superior to white people.

Perhaps the first incarnation of black supremacy was in the Rastafarian religion, which was founded on principles including the inherent wickedness of the white race and the absolute superiority of the black race. This philosophy, espoused by preachers like Leonard Howell, has been almost entirely abandoned in modern Rastafarianism, which has converts from all races. A few fringe groups, small in membership, continue to adhere to this philosophy.

In the 1930s a black supremacist organisation called the Nation of Islam was founded it came to prominence during the 1960s, when a number of radical groups began to emerge among African-Americans. These groups emerged as a response to the racism and bigotry that existed in many sectors of American society in that era. While most black groups worked to end racism and bigotry, a few of them worked to make bigotry symmetrical.

A small number of influential black supremacy groups still exist in the USA today, including Louis Farrakhan's Nation of Islam, and a splinter group led by Khalid Muhammed, called the New Black Panthers. Both of these groups distribute hate-speech towards white people and Jews. Most members of these groups are anti-Semitic, and they distribute tracts such as the Protocols of the Elders of Zion.

Black Hebrew Israelites

The Black Hebrew Israelite (BHI) movement is a racist black-supremacist group; despite its misleading name, its members are not Jews.

See also:


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